6 Stretches For Hoop Sessions

Before beginning any dance session it is important to limber up.

Copyright @ Sony Pictures Entertainment Company
Edits by BubiMandril
Copyright @ Sony Pictures Entertainment Company Edits by BubiMandril

Avoiding stretches can hurt your body and leave your style cramped. Often what stands in the way of learning a move, or breaking into the flow state is a lack of warm up.

Since you may not remember all those lessons from gym class we want to provide a simple routine of muscle moving stretches.

You can do any of these moves with or without your prop, but using a hoop can provide extra balance.

Relax Your Body

Starting from the feet stack your bones one over the other. Knees over ankles, hips over knees, shoulders over hips. Gently roll your shoulders and neck. Let go of tension and relax your body. Take 3 slow, deep breaths.

Rhona-Mae Arca
Rhona-Mae Arca

Back Extension

Bring arms over head and reach back gently for a back extension.

Forward Fold

Lori Jacobsen, Hoop Yogini
Lori Jacobsen, Hoop Yogini

Fold your body forward and let arms and head dangle. Widen your stance for deeper stretching.

Side Stretch

Bring your arms up and then arch to one side. Return to upright position and do to the opposite side. Repeat several times.

Twist

Twist gently from left to right, looking over your shoulder. Repeat several times.

Lori Jacobsen, Hoop Yogini
Lori Jacobsen, Hoop Yogini

Loosen Your Joints

Shake out your legs and arms. Gently roll ankles and wrists. Point and flex your feet and stretch wrists forward and back.

You're ready!

Take a moment and scan your body for any tense areas. If you are relaxed and warm, you are now ready to flow!

All of these stretches will help with body awareness and accuracy when playing with your prop. Remember to take a few minutes to connect with your body before practice. 

Photo by Adrian Scottow
Photo by Adrian Scottow

This lesson is provided by Lori Jacobsen. Lori is a master trainer for HoopYogini™. The only doctor approved hoop and yoga program for spinal health and wellness.

Featured image: Bayfront Park, Miami-Yoga Classes by Rafael Montilla

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2 Comments

  1. Jennifer Gottlieb Dixon on February 9, 2016 at 11:06 am

    Warming up is ALWAYS a good idea. It can save you from injury!

    • Julie The Hoop Monster on February 15, 2016 at 5:03 pm

      Thanks for the comment Jennifer, we agree, it is definitely important.
      Not only can it save you from injury, but it can also help prevent soreness after.
      Stretching helps to reduce lactic acid buildup

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